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Ground Zero 360

September 11- December 3

On September 11, 2001, New York City was shaken to its core. In the wake of the chaos, New York based Irish photographer Nicola McClean responded in the only way she knew how; she picked up her camera and took to the street to try and capture the confusion and panic that surrounded her.

The exhibition Ground Zero 360, was created by Nicola McClean and contains a stunning collection of images were made public for the first time in 2011. Through harrowing visuals, heartbreaking “missing posters” and a unique panoramic installation, Ground Zero 360 is astep into the past to what eight million New Yorkers were feeling in the days that followed the attacks.

Also included in the exhibition are 12 paintings by Irish artist Jim Fitpatrick, fragments of steel and granite from the World Trade Center and personal artifacts lent by families of the police officers and firefighters who lost their lives that day.

GROUND ZERO 360 Docent Packet

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On with the Show, This is It! Chuck Jones and the Animation Art of Looney Tunes

On loan from Daura Gallery, Lynchburg College

January 4- April 1

For more than 70 years, the funniest, most recklessly irreverent characters ever drawn on celluloid have been Looney Tunes. The split-second timing of Bugs Bunny, the giddy lunacy of Daffy Duck, the befuddled laughter of Elmer Fudd, and a slew of others were the work of animation artist Chuck Jones (1912-2002). Beginning with theatrical shorts of the 1930s, they have become international celebrities and a cornerstone of American popular culture. This exhibition explores the Looney Tunes characters and their capers as brought to life by Jones and voice artist Mel Blanc under the auspices of the cartoon shop at Warner Bros. Studios.

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The Work of Annita Delano

September 21 - December 31

On loan from Kim and Dr. Joseph Damiani 

Annita Delano (1894 - 1979) became a leader of the modernist painting movement in California, both as a painter and a professor of art. In 1917, she earned her diploma from Los Angeles State Normal School (UCLA) and then began her teaching career at UCLA from 1920 to 1963.  From 1944 to 1946, she was on the faculty of the Otis Art Institute. She lived primarily in Los Angeles but was noted for her southwestern desert landscapes and Indians figure and genre.  Beginning 1925, she painted most summers in New Mexico and Arizona, living among the Hopi, Navajo, and Zuni Indians. Her paintings were widely exhibited during her lifetime, both as part of group shows and in 30 solo exhibitions of her work.

This exhibition showcases her lifetime of work including, paintings, watercolors and well as many sketches, artist notes and personal memorial.